Impulsivity may be a risk factor in the transition from recreational to problem gaming

Abstract

Several factors of trait impulsivity were analysed to determine which may contribute towards potentially disordered gaming, as measured by the DSM-5 and ICD-11 criteria. Three-hundred and seventy-two adults, sourced from a convenient sample (prolific.co) and a targeted gaming forum sample (Reddit and Facebook), completed an online survey hosted at Qualtrics.com. Three-hundred and twenty-eight participants continued onto a Go/No-Go reaction time task hosted at Pavlovia.org to measure inhibitory control. Demographic information was collected alongside impulsivity measures (BIS-11, UPPS-P, and 27-MCQ) and dichotomous DSM-5 and ICD-11 gaming disorder symptoms. Impulsivity was found to relate to gaming at both an recreational and potentially disordered level, however negative and positive urgency and delay discounting appear to be associated with the highest symptom counts and may be potential factors in the transition between recreational and disordered gaming.

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chbr.2022.100230
Divisions: College of Health & Life Sciences > School of Psychology
College of Health & Life Sciences > Aston Institute of Health & Neurodevelopment (AIHN)
College of Health & Life Sciences
Funding Information: The study was funded by Aston University , Birmingham as part of a PhD studentship. Aston University were not involved in the study design, data collection, analysis or writeup. Ethical approval was granted by the Aston University ethics committee and was
Additional Information: Funding Information: The study was funded by Aston University , Birmingham as part of a PhD studentship. Aston University were not involved in the study design, data collection, analysis or writeup. Ethical approval was granted by the Aston University ethics committee and was in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association. Funding Information: Although concerns about computer games have their origin in the 1980s moral panic around video games and technology (Markey & Ferguson, 2017), it is only in recent years that diagnostic criteria have recognised the idea that a behaviour, similar to a substance, can be addictive. Prior to the inclusion of gambling as an addiction disorder in the DSM, it was classified as an impulse control disorder, a separate category from substance use disorders (Grant et al., 2011). Now, Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) is under review for inclusion as a disorder in future editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) (American Psychiatric Association., 2013), and Gaming Disorder (GD) was recognised by the World Health Organisation in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) (World Health Organisation., 2021) and defined as a pattern of gaming that is characterised by impaired control, increasing priority, and continuation or escalation of the behaviour. Despite this, there remains considerable debate about whether gaming behaviour can be disordered or addictive in the way that gambling, and substance addictions are (Aarseth et al., 2017; James & Tunney, 2017). Within this study we will therefore include both the ICD-11 and DSM-5 definitions of potentially problematic gaming for comparison.The study was funded by Aston University, Birmingham as part of a PhD studentship. Aston University were not involved in the study design, data collection, analysis or writeup. Ethical approval was granted by the Aston University ethics committee and was in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association. Publisher Copyright: © 2022
Uncontrolled Keywords: Addiction,Delay discounting,Gaming,Gaming disorder,Impulsivity,Internet gaming disorder,Neuroscience (miscellaneous),Applied Psychology,Human-Computer Interaction,Computer Science Applications,Cognitive Neuroscience,Artificial Intelligence
Publication ISSN: 2451-9588
Last Modified: 16 May 2024 07:28
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2023 08:42
Full Text Link:
Related URLs: http://www.scop ... tnerID=8YFLogxK (Scopus URL)
https://www.sci ... 451958822000641 (Publisher URL)
PURE Output Type: Article
Published Date: 2022-08-31
Published Online Date: 2022-08-13
Accepted Date: 2022-08-08
Authors: Raybould, Jodie N.
Larkin, Michael (ORCID Profile 0000-0003-3304-7000)
Tunney, Richard J. (ORCID Profile 0000-0003-4673-757X)

Export / Share Citation


Statistics

Additional statistics for this record