Plasma surface modification of two-component composite scaffolds consisting of 3D-printed and electrospun fiber components from biodegradable PLGA and PLCL

Abstract

In this study, two-component, morphologically composite scaffolds consisting of a 3D-printed component and an electrospun fiber component were fabricated and treated with a nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) plasma to enhance their surface properties. The 3D-printed component provided mechanical strength, while the electrospun fibrous component acted as a mimic to the extracellular matrix to improve cell-substrate interactions. Two biodegradable polyesters, poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) and poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), were used to create the scaffolds. The resulting 3D/E/N2-Ar scaffolds were characterized in terms of surface properties (morphology, chemical compositions, wettability, roughness, crystallinity), degradation, mechanical properties, and cell cytotoxicity, cell attachment and proliferation, LDH release and cell apoptosis. Results showed that the plasma treatment significantly increased the surface roughness, wettability, and hydrophilicity of the scaffolds. The 3D-printed component provided sufficient mechanical support, while the electrospun fiber component promoted cell attachment and proliferation. Following plasma treatment, the water contact angle of the scaffolds was greatly reduced from 124.0 ± 1.8° (PLCL) and 119.6 ± 1.4° (PLGA), to 0° and persisted even after 168 days. Human Schwann cells (SCs) showed excellent viability on both 3D/E/N2-Ar and 3D/E scaffolds were in excess of 95%. Cells cultivated on the 3D/E/N2-Ar scaffolds, with higher surface roughness, displayed significant increase in attachment and proliferation and a higher presence of healthy cells when compared with untreated 3D/E scaffolds. Both PLCL and PLGA scaffolds showed potential for use in biomedical applications. Although PLGA performed slightly better in terms of cell behavior, PLCL exhibited a slower degradation rate and higher tensile strain. These results demonstrate the potential of these designed scaffolds to support cell regeneration in clinically relevant devices such as nerve guide conduits and nerve protectant wraps.

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpolymj.2023.112135
Divisions: College of Engineering & Physical Sciences > Aston Institute of Materials Research (AIMR)
College of Engineering & Physical Sciences
College of Engineering & Physical Sciences > School of Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering > Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry
College of Engineering & Physical Sciences > Energy and Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI)
College of Engineering & Physical Sciences > Aston Polymer Research Group
College of Engineering & Physical Sciences > Engineering for Health
College of Engineering & Physical Sciences > Aston Advanced Materials
Funding Information: This work was supported by a scholarship under The Royal Golden Jubilee for a Ph.D. Program (PHD/0026/2559) and National Research University Project (NRU). The authors would like to thank the Department of Chemistry, Chiang Mai University, for providing t
Additional Information: Funding Information: This work was supported by a scholarship under The Royal Golden Jubilee for a Ph.D. Program (PHD/0026/2559) and National Research University Project (NRU). The authors would like to thank the Department of Chemistry, Chiang Mai University, for providing the research facilities and the printed electronic for fabrication by the National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), NSTDA for financial support. This project was also partially funded from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 871650 (MEDIPOL). Funding Information: This work was supported by a scholarship under The Royal Golden Jubilee for a Ph.D. Program ( PHD/0026/2559 ) and National Research University Project (NRU). The authors would like to thank the Department of Chemistry, Chiang Mai University, for providing the research facilities and the printed electronic for fabrication by the National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), NSTDA for financial support. This project was also partially funded from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 871650 (MEDIPOL). Publisher Copyright: Copyright © 2023 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Uncontrolled Keywords: 3D printing,Electrospinning,Plasma surface modification,Poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide),Poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone),General Physics and Astronomy,Polymers and Plastics,Organic Chemistry,Materials Chemistry
Publication ISSN: 1873-1945
Last Modified: 11 Jul 2024 07:23
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2023 15:43
Full Text Link:
Related URLs: https://www.sci ... 01430572300318X (Publisher URL)
PURE Output Type: Article
Published Date: 2023-07-24
Published Online Date: 2023-05-08
Accepted Date: 2023-05-04
Authors: Namhongsa, Manasanan
Daranarong, Donraporn
Molloy, Robert
Ross, Sukunya
Ross, Gareth M.
Tuantranont, Adisorn
Boonyawan, Dheerawan
Tocharus, Jiraporn
Sivasinprasasn, Sivanan
Topham, Paul D. (ORCID Profile 0000-0003-4152-6976)
Tighe, Brian J. (ORCID Profile 0000-0001-9601-8501)
Punyodom, Winita

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License: Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives


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