Counter-propaganda and spy fever:Germans in Washington, DC, during world war I

Abstract

During the First World War, the German immigrant community in Washington, DC, came under particular pressure due to its proximity to politically and strategically sensitive institutions. Accusations of sabotage and “hyphenated” loyalty led to an atmosphere of suspicion, suppression, internment, and expulsion. Ethnic leaders produced counter-propaganda to feed both their compatriots and the American public with alternative narratives of warfare. This work argues that these bellicose pro-German utterances aggravated tensions with the host society. Within a theoretical framework of diasporic connectedness, this article shows that reverberations of war affected civilians in places far removed from the frontlines. Studying the totality of war must include the study of diasporas and “enemy minorities.”

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.5406/jamerethnhist.40.1.0040
Divisions: ?? 75153200Jl ??
College of Business and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences & Humanities > Centre for Critical Inquiry into Society and Culture (CCISC)
College of Business and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences & Humanities > Centre for Language Research at Aston (CLaRA)
College of Business and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences & Humanities
?? 3980600Jl ??
Additional Information: Copyright 2020 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cultural Studies,History,Anthropology
Full Text Link:
Related URLs: https://www.pre ... ubmissions.html (Publisher URL)
http://www.scop ... tnerID=8YFLogxK (Scopus URL)
PURE Output Type: Article
Published Date: 2020-11-01
Accepted Date: 2020-01-01
Authors: Manz, Stefan (ORCID Profile 0000-0002-9136-0380)
Benbow, Mark

Download

[img]

Version: Accepted Version

Access Restriction: Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 November 2021.


Export / Share Citation


Statistics

Additional statistics for this record