Indirect effects of Daily Self-Control Demands on Subjective Vitality via Ego Depletion - How Daily Psychological Detachment Pays Off

Abstract

The present study uses a within‐person approach to provide insights into day‐specific dynamics in the relation between self‐control demands at work and well‐being. Integrating arguments derived from the Limited Strength Model of Self‐Control and research on spillover processes, we develop and test a theoretical model of how the adverse effects of day‐specific self‐control demands at work may spill over to the home domain. Specifically, we propose ego depletion at home (an indicator of regulatory resource depletion) as a mediator linking self‐control demands on a given working day to reduced subjective vitality at home (an indicator of well‐being).

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/apps.12172
Divisions: Aston Business School > Work & Organisational Psychology
Aston Business School
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Gombert, L. , Rivkin, W. and Schmidt, K. (2018), Indirect effects of Daily Self‐Control Demands on Subjective Vitality via Ego Depletion – How Daily Psychological Detachment Pays Off. Applied Psychology. Accepted Author Manuscript, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/apps.12172.  This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
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Related URLs: https://onlinel ... 1111/apps.12172 (Publisher URL)
PURE Output Type: Article
Published Date: 2018-09-07
Accepted Date: 2018-09-06
Authors: Gombert, L.
Rivkin, W. ( 0000-0003-3360-4962)
Schmidt, K.-h.

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