Coercion or Conformism? Censorship and Self-Censorship among Russian Media Personalities and Reporters in the 2010s

Schimpfossl, Elisabeth and Yablokov, Ilya (2014). Coercion or Conformism? Censorship and Self-Censorship among Russian Media Personalities and Reporters in the 2010s. Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization, 22 (2), pp. 295-311.

Abstract

Federal television is a crucial element of the political system in Putin’s Russia. 88% of the Russian population use television news as their prime source of information, 65% regard the news reporting as objective and 51% trust television as an information source.[1] Television is, therefore, the primary and most effective tool employed by the political regime to influence its people. Since the onset of the Ukraine conflict and more hostile relations between Russia and the West, Russia’s main television channels have confounded the world with their ability to convince viewers of stories which are diametrically opposed to those shown in the West. What the Russian viewers see on state-aligned television is strongly shaped by the Kremlin. Particularly during Putin’s third presidential term, news reporting has become more propagandistic.

Divisions: Languages & Social Sciences
Additional Information: Copyright: Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization
Published Date: 2014
Authors: Schimpfossl, Elisabeth
Yablokov, Ilya

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