A question of fit:cultural and individual differences in interpersonal justice perceptions

Game, Annilee M. and Crawshaw, Jonathan R. (2017). A question of fit:cultural and individual differences in interpersonal justice perceptions. Journal of Business Ethics, 144 (2), pp. 279-291.

Abstract

This study examined the link between employees’ adult attachment orientations and perceptions of line managers’ interpersonal justice behaviors, and the moderating effect of national culture (collectivism). Participants from countries categorized as low collectivistic (N = 205) and high collectivistic (N = 136) completed an online survey. Attachment anxiety and avoidance were negatively related to interpersonal justice perceptions. Cultural differences did not moderate the effects of avoidance. However, the relationship between attachment anxiety and interpersonal justice was non-significant in the Southern Asia (more collectivistic) cultural cluster. Our findings indicate the importance of ‘fit’ between cultural relational values and individual attachment orientations in shaping interpersonal justice perceptions, and highlight the need for more non-western organizational justice research.

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-015-2824-9
Divisions: Aston Business School > Work & Organisational Psychology
Aston Business School
Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-015-2824-9
Uncontrolled Keywords: attachment,culture,ethics,fit,interpersonal justice,line manager,perception,Business and International Management,Economics and Econometrics,Business, Management and Accounting(all),Law,Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
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Related URLs: http://www.scop ... tnerID=8YFLogxK (Scopus URL)
Published Online Date: 2015-08-22
Published Date: 2017-08-01
Authors: Game, Annilee M.
Crawshaw, Jonathan R. ( 0000-0001-7168-5607)

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Version: Accepted Version


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