Visual function and subjective quality of life compared in subjects with acquired macular disease

Hazel, Charlotte A., Petre, Keziah L., Armstrong, Richard A., Benson, Mark T. and Frost, N. Andrew Visual function and subjective quality of life compared in subjects with acquired macular disease. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 41 (6), pp. 1309-1315.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the objective measures of visual function that are most relevant to subjective quality of vision and perceived reading ability in patients with acquired macular disease. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with macular disease underwent a comprehensive assessment of visual function. The patients also completed a vision-related quality-of-life questionnaire that included a section of general questions about perceived visual performance and a section with specific questions on reading. RESULTS: Results of all tests of vision correlated highly with reported vision-related quality-of-life impairment. Low-contrast tests explained most of the variance in self-reported problems with reading. Text-reading speed correlated highly with overall concern about vision. CONCLUSIONS: Reading performance is strongly associated with vision-related quality of life. High-contrast distance acuity is not the only relevant measure of visual function in relation to the perceived visual performance of a patient with macular disease. The results suggest the importance of print contrast, even over print size, in reading performance in patients with acquired macular disease.

Divisions: Life & Health Sciences > Optometry
Life & Health Sciences > Ophthalmic Research Group
Life & Health Sciences > Health Sciences
Uncontrolled Keywords: visual function,subjective,quality of vision,perceived reading ability,acquired,macular disease,METHODS,Twenty-eight patients with macular disease underwent a comprehensive assessment of visual function. The patients also completed a vision-related quality-of-life questionnaire that included a section of general questions about perceived visual performance and a section with specific questions on reading.,RESULTS,Results of all tests of vision correlated highly with reported vision-related quality-of-life impairment. Low-contrast tests explained most of the variance in self-reported problems with reading. Text-reading speed correlated highly with overall concern about vision.,CONCLUSIONS,Reading performance is strongly associated with vision-related quality of life. High-contrast distance acuity is not the only relevant measure of visual function in relation to the perceived visual performance of a patient with macular disease. The results suggest the importance of print contrast,even over print size,in reading performance in patients with acquired macular disease.
Authors: Hazel, Charlotte A.
Petre, Keziah L.
Armstrong, Richard A.
Benson, Mark T.
Frost, N. Andrew

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