Individual differences in cognitive style and their effects on task and social orientations of self-managed work teams

Armstrong, Seven J. and Priola, Vincenza Individual differences in cognitive style and their effects on task and social orientations of self-managed work teams. Small group research, 32 (3), pp. 283-312.

Abstract

When assembling self-managing work teams, the personalities of team members are often overlooked. One personality variable known to be critical for effective decision making in teams is cognitive style. This study sought to examine how differences and similarities in analytic/intuitive cognitive styles affected the behavior of team members on the task/emotionally expressive dimension identified by Bales. As hypothesized, intuitive individuals and homogeneous intuitive teams were found to initiate more social-emotional acts. Contrary to expectations, intuitive rather than analytic individuals and homogeneous intuitive rather than analytic teams engaged in more task-oriented behaviors. Teams also tended to select intuitive individuals as leaders. The possibility that different combinations of styles may be important for overall team effectiveness was subsequently discussed, and it was suggested that this may depend on whether the nature of the work environment is relatively well structured and mechanistic or relatively unstructured and organic.

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/104649640103200302
Divisions: Aston Business School > Work & organisational psychology
Aston Business School > Work & organisational psychology research group
Uncontrolled Keywords: self-managing work teams,personalities,team members,personality variable,effective decision making,teams,cognitive style,behavior,task/emotionally expressive dimension,Bales,homogeneous intuitive teams,social-emotional acts,analytic teams,task-oriented behaviors,leaders,work environment

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