Two observational studies examining the effect of a social norm and a health message on the purchase of vegetables in student canteen settings.

Collins, Emily, Thomas, Jason, Robinson, Eric, Aveyard, Paul, Jebb, Susan, Herman, Peter and Higgs, Suzanne (2019). Two observational studies examining the effect of a social norm and a health message on the purchase of vegetables in student canteen settings. Appetite, 132 , pp. 122-130.

Abstract

There is some evidence from laboratory-based studies that descriptive social-norm messages are associated with increased consumption of vegetables, but evidence of their effectiveness in real-world settings is limited. In two observational field studies taking an ecological approach, a vegetable-related social norm (e.g. "Did you know that most students here choose to eat vegetables with their meal?"), and a health message (e.g. "Did you know that students who choose to eat vegetables have a lower risk of heart disease?") were displayed in two different student canteens. Purchases were observed during three stages: baseline, intervention (when the posters were displayed) and immediate post-intervention (when the posters had been removed). Study 1 (n = 7598) observed the purchase of meals containing a portion of vegetables and Study 2 (n = 4052) observed the purchase of side portions of vegetables. In Study 1, relative to baseline, the social-norms intervention was associated with an increase in purchases of vegetables (from 63% to 68% of meals; OR = 1.24, CI = 1.03-1.49), which was sustained post-intervention (67% of meals; OR = 0.96, CI = 0.80-1.15). There was no effect of the health message (75% of meals at baseline, and 74% during the intervention; OR = 0.98, CI = 0.83-1.15). In Study 2, relative to baseline, there was an effect of both the social norm (22.9% of meals at baseline, rising to 32.5% during the intervention; OR = 1.62, CI = 1.27-2.05) and health message (rising from 43.8% at baseline to 52.8%; OR = 0.59, CI = 0.46-0.75). The increase was not sustained post-intervention for the social norm intervention (22.1%; OR = 0.59, CI = 0.46-0.75), but was sustained for the health intervention (48.1%; OR = 0.83, CI = 0.67-1.02). These results support further testing of the effectiveness of such messages in encouraging healthier eating and indicate the need for larger-scale testing at multiple sites using a randomised-controlled design.

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2018.09.024
Divisions: Life & Health Sciences
Life & Health Sciences > Applied Health Research Group
Additional Information: © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Descriptive norm,Field study,Healthy eating,Social norms,Vegetables,Psychology(all),Nutrition and Dietetics
Full Text Link:
Related URLs: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666318305890?via%3Dihub (Publisher URL)
Published Online Date: 2019-01-01
Published Date: 2019-01-01
Authors: Collins, Emily
Thomas, Jason ( 0000-0001-7013-8994)
Robinson, Eric
Aveyard, Paul
Jebb, Susan
Herman, Peter
Higgs, Suzanne

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