Corporate social responsibility and organizational commitment:the moderating role of individuals’ attitudes to CSR

Crawshaw, Jonathan R.; van Dick, Rolf and Boodhoo, Yoshina (2014). Corporate social responsibility and organizational commitment:the moderating role of individuals’ attitudes to CSR. Politische Psychologie (1),

Abstract

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) becomes ever more important for organizations. In times of corporate scandals and more governmental regulation on the one hand and a foreseeable shortage of highly qualified employees on the other, CSR is both a means to serve the wider society and to attract employees with a positive reputation and image. The aim of the present study was to determine whether CSR activities as perceived by employees indeed lead to more employee affective commitment and whether this would be moderated by employee differences in importance of CSR. The study differentiated two forms of CSR, namely corporate social responsibility directed towards individual employees (CSR-E) and directed towards the wider society (CSR-S). We surveyed 89 employees and found evidence for the predicted moderation and for both forms of CSR such that CSR-E and CSR-S and affective commitment were only positively related for those employees who evaluated CSR as important. Implications for recruitment and future research are discussed.

Divisions: Aston Business School > Work & organisational psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: corporate social responsibility,affektives Commitment in Unternehmen,Bedeutung der CSR,moderation
Published Date: 2014-01

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

Export / Share Citation


Statistics

Additional statistics for this record