Cooling of greenhouses using seawater:a solar driven liquid-desiccant cycle for greenhouse cooling in hot climates

Davies, P.A.; Harris, I. and Knowles, P.R. (2006). Cooling of greenhouses using seawater:a solar driven liquid-desiccant cycle for greenhouse cooling in hot climates. IN: Proceedings of the international symposium on greenhouse cooling. Bailey, B.J. (ed.) ISHS Acta Horticulturae . Almería (ES): International Society for Horticultural Science.

Abstract

Evaporative pads are frequently used for the cooling of greenhouses. However, a drawback of this method is the consumption of freshwater. In this paper it is shown, both theoretically and through a practical example, that effective evaporative cooling can be achieved using seawater in place of fresh water. The advantages and drawbacks of using seawater are discussed more generally. In climates that are both hot and humid, evaporative systems cannot always provide sufficient cooling, with the result that cultivation often has to be halted during the hottest months of the year. To overcome this, we propose a concept in which a desiccant pad is used to dehumidify the air before it enters the evaporative pad. The desiccant pad is supplied with a hygroscopic liquid that is regenerated by the energy of the sun. The performance of this concept has been modelled and the properties of various liquids have been compared. An attractive option is to obtain the liquid from seawater itself, given that seawater contains hygroscopic salts such as magnesium chloride. Preliminary experiments are reported in which magnesium chloride solution has been regenerated beneath a solar simulator.

Divisions: Engineering & Applied Sciences > Mechanical engineering & design
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Event Title: International Symposium on Greenhouse Cooling
Event Type: Other
Event Dates: 2006-04-24 - 2006-04-27
Uncontrolled Keywords: evaporative cooling,desiccant cooling,solar energy
Published Date: 2006-09-30

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