Differential patterns of activity and functional connectivity in emotion processing neural circuitry to angry and happy faces in adolescents with and without suicide attempt

Pan, L.A., Hassel, S., Segreti, A.M., Nau, S.A., Brent, D.A. and Phillips, M.L. (2013). Differential patterns of activity and functional connectivity in emotion processing neural circuitry to angry and happy faces in adolescents with and without suicide attempt. Psychological Medicine, 43 (10), pp. 2129-2142.

Abstract

Background - Neural substrates of emotion dysregulation in adolescent suicide attempters remain unexamined. Method - We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural activity to neutral, mild or intense (i.e. 0%, 50% or 100% intensity) emotion face morphs in two separate emotion-processing runs (angry and happy) in three adolescent groups: (1) history of suicide attempt and depression (ATT, n = 14); (2) history of depression alone (NAT, n = 15); and (3) healthy controls (HC, n = 15). Post-hoc analyses were conducted on interactions from 3 group × 3 condition (intensities) whole-brain analyses (p < 0.05, corrected) for each emotion run. Results - To 50% intensity angry faces, ATT showed significantly greater activity than NAT in anterior cingulate gyral–dorsolateral prefrontal cortical attentional control circuitry, primary sensory and temporal cortices; and significantly greater activity than HC in the primary sensory cortex, while NAT had significantly lower activity than HC in the anterior cingulate gyrus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. To neutral faces during the angry emotion-processing run, ATT had significantly lower activity than NAT in the fusiform gyrus. ATT also showed significantly lower activity than HC to 100% intensity happy faces in the primary sensory cortex, and to neutral faces in the happy run in the anterior cingulate and left medial frontal gyri (all p < 0.006,corrected). Psychophysiological interaction analyses revealed significantly reduced anterior cingulate gyral–insula functional connectivity to 50% intensity angry faces in ATT v. NAT or HC. Conclusions - Elevated activity in attention control circuitry, and reduced anterior cingulate gyral–insula functional connectivity, to 50% intensity angry faces in ATT than other groups suggest that ATT may show inefficient recruitment of attentional control neural circuitry when regulating attention to mild intensity angry faces, which may represent a potential biological marker for suicide risk.

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291712002966
Divisions: Life & Health Sciences > Psychology
Life & Health Sciences
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Additional Information: Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013
Uncontrolled Keywords: adolescents,anterior cingulate,depression,emotion processing,insula,suicide
Full Text Link: http://journals ... ine&aid=8811304
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Published Date: 2013-10
Authors: Pan, L.A.
Hassel, S. ( 0000-0001-7240-1581)
Segreti, A.M.
Nau, S.A.
Brent, D.A.
Phillips, M.L.

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