The spatial patterns of plaques and tangles in Alzheimer's disease do not support the 'cascade hypothesis'

Armstrong, Richard A., Myers, D. and Smith, C.U.M. (1993). The spatial patterns of plaques and tangles in Alzheimer's disease do not support the 'cascade hypothesis'. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 4 (1), pp. 16-20.

Abstract

In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the 'Cascade hypothesis' proposes that the formation of paired helical filaments (PHF) may be casually linked to the deposition of beta/A4 protein. Hence, there should be a close spatial relationship between senile plaques and cellular neurofibrillary tangles in a local region of the brain. In tissue from 6 AD patients, plaques and tangles occurred in clusters and individual clusters were often regularly spaced along the cortical strip. However, the clusters of plaques and tangles were in phase in only 4/32 cortical tissues examined. Hence, the data were not consistent with the 'Cascade hypothesis' that beta/A4 and PHF are directly linked in AD.

Publication DOI: https://doi.org/10.1159/000107291
Divisions: Life & Health Sciences > Optometry
Life & Health Sciences > Ophthalmic Research Group
Life & Health Sciences
Uncontrolled Keywords: Alzheimer's disease,cascade hypothesis,senile plaques,neurofibrillary tangles,spatial patterns
Full Text Link: http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?typ=pdf&doi=107291
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Published Date: 1993
Authors: Armstrong, Richard A. ( 0000-0002-5046-3199)
Myers, D.
Smith, C.U.M.

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